Need to Cool Down? 10 Ways to Get on the Water in Whistler

Floating Dock at a Lake Whistler

Need to Cool Down? 10 Ways to Get on the Water in Whistler

When the temperatures rise there’s no better place to be than on the water, and we’re lucky enough in Whistler to have five beautiful lakes connected by glacier-fed rivers and gently flowing waterways.  Here’s our guide to the top ways to get on the water this summer:

1. Canoe

Not only super Canadian, but great fun. Grab a friend and explore the shoreline. More Info

Canoeing the River of Golden Dreams

2. White Water Rafting

This year’s deep snowpack means plenty of meltwater in the rivers – get ready for a wild guided ride. More Info

White Water Rafting in Whistler

PHOTO THE ADVENTURE GROUP WHISTLER

3. Swim

Ah, the simple joy of swimming. Did you know mountain views are always better from the floating docks? More Info

Floating Dock at a Lake Whistler

Insider Tip: Canoe, Kayak and Stand Up Paddleboard Rentals

All these watercraft are available for hire in Whistler. Check out Whistler Eco Tours at Wayside Park and Backroads Whistler at Lakeside Park (both on Alta Lake), or book your rental craft online here.

4. Stand Up Paddleboarding

An intensely popular sport that is not as hard as it looks. Check out SUP yoga classes for extra fun. More Info

Paddleboarding on Alta Lake in Whistler

5. Jet Boat

Knock it up a notch with a jet boat tour, mixing wild rides with discovering the gorgeous waterways. More Info

Jet Boating in Whistler

6. Floatplane Tour

Ok, so only the takeoff and landing is on the water – but the views of glaciers and ice capped peaks on your tour are sure to chill you down. More Info

Floatplane Tour Over Whistler

PHOTO EMILY SMITH

7. Go Fishing

Not only is the fishing good on Whistler’s lakes, but there are several tour operators that can take you to some wild and beautiful backcountry fishing spots as well. More Info

Fly Fishing on the Lakes in Whistler

PHOTO FEET BANKS

8. Kayak

Go solo or with a friend, these maneuverable watercraft are perfect for exploring the River of Golden Dreams. Not sure your paddling skills are there? Take a guided tour and learn as you go. More Info

Kayaking down the River of Golden Dreams in Whistler

Insider Tip: Water Safety Tips

Whether swimming or paddling, stay safe on the water this summer. Lakes and beaches don’t come with lifeguards, so keep an eye out for each other and the kids while swimming and if you are venturing out for a paddle make sure you have the required safety equipment (eg life jacket) on board.

Always chose the right craft too – floaties, pool toys and inflatable boats are OK for floating, but definitely not suitable for longer missions like the fast waters of the River of Golden Dreams. One pop and the fun stops! Check out these Boating and Water Safety Tips from the Resort Municipality of Whistler for more information.

9. Hit up the Water Park

Meadow Park in Whistler has a great indoor fun zone, and a small but much loved water park for the kids. More Info

Great way to cool off at the Meadow Park kids water park

10. Go Sailing

Breeze  plus water equals cool. The Whistler Sailing Club operates on Alta Lake, private lessons and guided sailing tours as well as charter boats. More Info

Sailing on Alta Lake in Whistler

Bonus: Hydrotherapy

While the hot tub might not be too appealing at midday, a hotel with a pool might just be the ticket. Also worth checking out? Whistler’s spas.

Stoney Creek - North Star Pool in Whistler

Looking for other ways to cool down? Try going into the alpine,  ziplining (what a breeze!), sit on a cool patio or duck indoors to check out Whistler’s museums and galleries. For all your other summer needs, check out Whistler.com.

 

Pip Campbell

Pip Campbell

Pip has somehow worked her way around from being a snow-and-bike bum to holding a real job while also being outdoors as much as possible. She’s collected scars, bikes for (almost) every occasion, a small trail dog and a love of craft beer plus a rudimentary understanding of skiing, snowboarding, sketching, and the art of chairlift conversations. She currently believes a combination of gravity, snow, dirt and rad people are what make Whistler tick but investigations are ongoing.

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