5 Days 5 Ways in Whistler: It’s a Spring Thing

Whistler Village in Spring

5 Days 5 Ways in Whistler: It’s a Spring Thing

There’s a special energy in the mountains in spring. There’s more daylight, it’s warm enough to sit on a patio without a heater, you can finally wander without winter boots and a chilled out vibe replaces the ski-til-you-drop buzz. April through June is the ultimate time to visit for a different look at Whistler, as there’s adventures above and below the snowline to try, dining specials everywhere and an entire village to explore.

Our team of Insiders have been out and about this spring capturing the good times, turning five days in Whistler into five ways to get a change of scene.

Day 1 – Home Away From Home

Be whisked directly from the airport to Whistler by Pacific Coach Lines soaking up the magnificent Sea to Sky views along the way. Settle in to your home for the next five days at the gorgeous Fairmont Chateau Whistler in the Upper Village – pick up a map from the concierge, wander the cool lobby and sunny patio and make sure you check out the menus at the Mallard Lounge, Wildflower Restaurant and Portobello for when you get peckish later (may we recommend the chocolate tasting experience?).

Then head out to check out the Upper Village Stroll restaurants, galleries and pubs, just steps away. Need a post arrival beer? Enjoy one with views of Whistler and Blackcomb at HandleBar.

Fairmont Chateau Whistler Lobby

Welcome, travelers, to the Fairmont Chateau Whistler. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Fairmont Chateau Whistler pool

Settle in, check out the facilities. Did you pack your swimsuit? PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Portobello Bakery, Whistler

Hotel dining options include the Mallard Lounge, Wildflower Restaurant and Portobello Market and Fresh Bakery (pictured) PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Handlebar Apres in Whistler

A short stroll from the Village, Handlebar has a selection of craft beers and an excellent selection of scotch whiskey. Cheers to being outside again. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Fairmont Chateau Whistler in Spring

Rest well – there’s a big day ahead. PHOTO MIKE CRANE

Day 2 – Action and Adventure

Go all in, first up. Get picked up in Whistler Village and driven out to the Whistler Heliport, where a dashing pilot from Blackcomb Helicopters awaits to take you on a flight over Whistler and the surrounding mountains. See the famous ski slopes of Whistler Blackcomb from the air, and fly over frozen lakes and monumental glaciers before landing on a mountain for a little fresh air.

Keep the flight theme going with an afternoon with The Adventure Group out at Cougar Mountain. Take a side by side up to the zipline course, then it’s time for gravity to do it’s work. It’s 360 degree views, wind in your hair and thrills aplenty – after a day like today it will take a while to come back down to earth.

Blackcomb Helicopters Tour

Mean machine. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

 WHistler Helicopter Sightseeing

Flying makes you feel like a kid again. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Whistler Blackcomb Helicopters

Plenty of snow on the tour landing site to play in. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Black Tusk Helicopter Tour

Black Tusk from the air. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains

Hello, Whistler. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Hitcase photo RZR Tour

Part 1 of the trip with The Adventure Group – RZR time! PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Part 2 – flying on the ziplines, getting a little stylee. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Day 3 – Fresh Air and Exercise

Start the day off right with a round at the Whistler Golf Club, close to Whistler Village. A certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary, the golf course is not just a top place to play, but offers plenty of potential for wildlife sightings among the trees. Black bears, birds of all kinds, beavers and even a family of raccoons call the course home. Be sure to hit Palmer’s Gallery and Grill patio for a post-round beverage and lunch.

Keep the momentum with a mellow stroll around Lost Lake before grabbing a bite at one of Whistler’s restaurants, where now is the time to grab spring dining specials. Breathe deep, and pause by the lake for a while.

Whistler Golf Club

Whistler Golf Club’s 16th Hole. Par 4, perfect views. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Whistler Golf Club lesson

Getting the lay of the land. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Whistler Golf Club Hole 13

Hole #13 at the Whistler Golf Club, also known as “Bear Island”. But don’t let that distract you. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Palmers Gallery and Grill

Here’s to making it to the 19th hole, aka Palmer’s Gallery and Grill. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Skunk Cabbage Whistler

Spring is the only time to catch early season blooms. PHOTO JUSTA JESKOVA

Lost Lake Hike Whistler

It’s a gentle walk around Lost Lake, perfect for getting the legs ready for summer hiking. PHOTO MIKE CRANE

Day 4 – Mind and Body

Take a chilled out day, starting with a stroll to the Audain Art Museum. The award-winning gallery is a spectacular building filled with incredible array of artworks and historical First Nations pieces. Docent tours are an excellent way to familiarise yourself with the key artists on display in the Permanent Collection and the rotating exhibits.

Follow the gallery session with time out at the Scandinave Spa, the perfect way to absorb the learnings of the morning in peace and quiet. Soothe the muscles with rounds of hot-cold-relaxation wandering between steam room, pool and lounge chairs. You can stay all the way into the evening if you want, watching the sun set behind the mountains. A good day for body and soul.

Audain Art Musuem Entrance

Recently awarded the 2018 RIBA International Award for Architecture, the Audain is an impressive venue. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

The Dance Screen (The Scream Too) was created by Haida artist James Hart. This magnificent piece must be seen to be appreciated. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Audain Art Museum

With permanent and rotating exhibitions, there’s always something new to discover in the galleries of the Audain. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Scandinave Spa cold pool

Refreshing and invigorating, a cold plunge sets the skin to tingling at the Scandinave Spa Whistler. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Scandinave Spa Deck Chair

Spring is here, time for some sun. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Hot tub spa whistler

Can we stay here forever? PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Day 5 –  Shop and Socialise

Wander pedestrian-only walkways of Whistler Village from beginning to end, checking out the spring sales, the galleries and the patios. Grab a quick snack for lunch and have a mini-picnic in a park, and end the day with a feast with friends on a sunny afternoon patio like Earl’s Kitchen + Bar Whistler – it’s elevated above the Stroll for better people-watching. Order as a group and dine family-style as you watch the progression of bikers, hikers, skiers and snowboarders soaking up the spring sun and Village vibe.

It’s your last day, so how long you stay out is up to you…just be sure to arrange a late checkout so you don’t have to rush.

Whistler Village in Spring

There are worse places for a walk and shop. PHOTO JUSTA JESKOVA

Whistler Village Bikini Store

New suit for summer? PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Whistler Village Hat Store

Something for lakeside lounging, perhaps. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Earls Whistler

Shopping is thirsty work. Lucky there’s patios all through the Village, carefully placed to capture spring sun. PHOTO PIP CAMPBELL

Earls Whistler Patio

Earl’s Whistler has a top notch patio and drinks list. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

Warls Whistler food menu

…and the menu is extensive. No complaints from the crew with this amazing spread. PHOTO JESSIE BYRNE

It’s a Spring Thing Contest – Enter for Your Chance to Win

This is just the tip of the iceberg for the goodness of spring. Keep an eye on the Insider’s spring blogs for more ideas and things to do through June.

 

 

 

Pip Campbell

Pip Campbell

Pip has somehow worked her way around from being a snow-and-bike bum to holding a real job while also being outdoors as much as possible. She’s collected scars, bikes for (almost) every occasion, a small trail dog and a love of craft beer plus a rudimentary understanding of skiing, snowboarding, sketching, and the art of chairlift conversations. She currently believes a combination of gravity, snow, dirt and rad people are what make Whistler tick but investigations are ongoing.

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